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20130113
20130121
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KQED (PBS) 4
CSPAN 3
KPIX (CBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
point if you remember, the president was hoping he could get a debt ceiling deal tied to the fiscal cliff negotiation. that didn't happen. the republicans gave up that negotiation. but they're hoping that the debt ceiling raising will give them the leverage that they need to get what they want when it comes to spending cuts. the president hopes though that he can by delegitimizing this idea of having the debt ceiling as a debate, have them have no leverage going into the deficit-cutting discussion or at least a lot less leverage. >> bill: the other big topic, the only other topic actually raised at the news conference yesterday other than whether or not you elect a party, president likes to have a party. was the issue of guns where the president was not specific because he hasn't seen -- or wasn't ready to list all of the recommendations that may have come out of the biden task force. but the president did express and repeat his resolve to do something about this issue of gun violence. no doubt about that, was there? >> no. while he put off getting into the details a little bit, he
'm tired of negotiating all those things, raised the debt ceiling and then i will get on with other conversations with you about dealing with the sequester, the across-the-board spending cuts and other budget related issues. but not until you take care of the debt ceiling and get that off the table that was the president's principal message today and he got a lot of conversation about why not negotiate. he said he's to the going to. we'll leave it there at least for the time being. >> rose: what will the republicans do, will they shut down the government. >> no, not over the debt ceiling. they may over the continuing resolution this is not their best vehicle. my guess is what they will probably have to do is give him a short-term extension. and then see if the senate will go along. they being of course the house republicans and just try to prolong this fight for a while. they don't want to have-- not shutting down the government is really spooking the credit markets and everything that major talked about a moment ago. and how the president would handle short-term extension is anothe
deals that were contingent upon or in the context of raising the debt ceiling. you, yourself, four times have done that. three times, those were related to deficit reduction or budget maneuvers. what chuck and i and i think many people are curious about is this new, adamant desire on your part not to negotiate, when that seems to conflict with the entire history in the modern era of american presidents and the debt ceiling, and your own history on the debt ceiling. and doesn't that suggest that we are going to go into a default situation because no one is talking to each other about how to resolve this? >> well, no, major, i think if you look at the history, getting votes for the debt ceiling is always difficult, and budgets in this town are always difficult. i went through this just last year. but what's different is we never saw a situation as we saw last year in which certain groups in congress took such an absolutist position that we came within a few days of defaulting. and the fact of the matter is, is that we have never seen the debt ceiling used in this fashion, where the notion
: the new republicans in congress were threatening to vote against raising the debt ceiling. if congress didn't act by august 2, the federal government would be unable to pay its bills. >> in 2010, when all these republicans were running for congress, many of them avowed tea partiers and the rest of them riding the tea party wave, the subject of the impending debt ceiling came up frequently and virtually all of them campaigned saying... pledging not to raise the debt ceiling. >> narrator: early on, republican freshmen attended orientation sessions. republican strategist frank luntz ran one of them. >> and i asked the question, how many of you are going to vote for the debt ceiling? and only three or four of them raised their hands. and i said, if you vote for the debt ceiling, the people who put you in office are going to knock you out. >> if you vote for the debt ceiling, you're voting for your own death certificate, political death certificate. >> narrator: for his part, the president decided to try something new: personal politics. he figured he could connect to the republican leader,
to add the 14th amendment to have the president do something to avert this curious problem with the debt ceiling. they don't agree with either of those two approaches because those two approaches have a role for the president and they say the president has no role here. it's all congress dealing with bills they've already i mean spending they've already done. that's the difference in posture. >> schieffer: do you think that the big fight is going to be over whether to raise the debt celling or over the so quealdso-called scwels if you sequester and that is to avoid these cuts in the program. >> there's a big fight among republicans about this because the debt celling is more powerful because the pain is if we blow the debt ceiling is real. for some republicans because the pain is so big -- >> schieffer: what would be the impact on the defense department, rajiv, if the cuts goes into effect. >> it takes us back to level of defense spending we had back in 2006 and 07. it's far more than we're spending in 2001. yes, there will be jobs furloughed, there will be weapons system but we won't
to a deal. next, john from tennessee. caller: good morning. i am calling about the debt ceiling. yes, it does need to be raised. because we have to pay our bills. if the government is allowed to borrow money and set their circumstances, then why is the private business sector not allowed to do that? the federal reserve has been shut down as far as to the bankers, as far as the this man being able to borrow money. the industry in the united states needs money to operate on and and. we need to be able to borrow money. if his mrs. are not allowed to expand and grow, how do they expect to pay the us -- these debts down the road? get these guys out of here. they do not need to be making a lifetime commitment. they have gotten old and senile and did not even know where they are. it is a shame that our government has gone this far. it is just terrible. host: thank you for the call. if you're just joining us, or listening on c-span radio, thank you for joining us. the question we are asking is whether or not you think the president can bypass congress to raise the debt ceiling. you can join
at the end of the year, and they're going to use the debt ceiling as their leverage. and interesting -- one interesting thing to watch for in all this is how the republican leaders in congress handle this because there are -- the republican leaders don't want a huge fight over the debt ceiling. but the rank-and-file members do. so how they navigate that is going to have a huge impact on how this plays out, but it's going to be a tremendous fight. and the idea that the president's going to not get to negotiate over the debt ceiling, it's not going to happen. >> well, to that end, what carol's saying, david, there are some in the gop who have suggested a partial government shutdown may be needed to get the spending cuts that they want. do you think that's where we're headed? >> well, i think it's very possible. if you look at how the fiscal cliff played out, as carol noted, republicans didn't get a number of things they were shooting for on their end. so politically, as well as substantively, the fiscal cliff, the debt ceiling i should say, then becomes their next avenue for being able to ext
ahead of debt ceiling conversations, days after fiscal quick negotiations -- days after fiscal cliff negotiations. was that deal good for poor people? >> for 30 years, we have not addressed this issue, except for the wonderful work that you and cornel are doing in these wonderful people on the panel. politics has neglected the poor. one could say that there was a war on the poor rather than a war on poverty for much of this period. the united states has by far the most poverty of any of the high- income countries as a share of the population. we have the highest in quality. we have the most entrenched underclass. we have had the biggest increases of any quality by far, and we've had the least political response of any high- income countries, so we are standing out on our own. this has been a 30-year trend of soaring in comes at the top, stagnation in the middle, and falling through the floor on the bottom, and the political system has refused to address this for 30 years. so we have reached a calamitous situation in this country, but the fact of the matter is nothing that was done at
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)